Sunday, June 24, 2012

Colorado Rockies

To train for my upcoming hike, I hiked for two days in the Ptarmigan Peaks, outside of Dillon, Colorado, between elevations of 9,000 and 13,000 feet. It was the first time I've ever hiked at that sort of altitude, and by the end of Day-1, after about 15 miles, I had a raging headache, which forced me to end my day early and set up camp.

I was surprised with how round and bulbous the mountains were. I was expecting razor-sharp ridge lines and towering spires, but I was happy to have nice, hard, flat ground to walk on for the most part. Pictures below...






There were no water sources along the trail, so I had to rely on snow, which I packed into my water bottle and drank after it melted. 





8 comments:

Chris said...

Guess what man. I'm mostly certain we are moving to Denver. Let Josh know and also ask him if he can send me an e-mail with some good places around Broomfield to look for houses.

Anonymous said...

Nice pics. What camera/lens/equipment are you using?

Ken said...

Chris--Great news. I'm on it.

Anon--Thanks. Having broken my last two cameras, I just recently spent a pretty penny on a new waterproof, shatterproof, bombproof Olympus Tough camera (TG-1 I think it's called). I was actually quite disappointed with how a lot of the shots turned out, so I'm glad to get your compliment. No lens or equipment were involved.

Anonymous said...

Um, I just happened on your blog and don't mean to be a know-it-all, but you can get sick from not treating snow, just like water. I always boil it to melt it, thus killing bugs as well. In Colorado especially, there's so much human-interface crap, you'd be crazy not to...
Good luck.

Tom said...

Just wondering if you could tell me exactly what mountain trail that is? Maybe you have GPS coordinates?

Ken said...

Anon--That's probably good advice, but boiling it would have been impossible. There were 25 mph winds on the mountain ridges, which would have prevented me from getting a good flame on my stove. I had some chlorine dioxide tablets which I could have used, but I wasn't sure if they'd dissolve properly in slush. So I just took my chances. I've "drank" snow lots of time in AK without getting sick, but perhaps I should be more wary when doing so in the lower-48.

Ken said...

Tom--No coordinates, but easy to find. Here's a link with some info:

https://fs.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsinternet/!ut/p/c5/04_SB8K8xLLM9MSSzPy8xBz9CP0os3gDfxMDT8MwRydLA1cj72BTSw8jAwgAykeaxcN4jhYG_h4eYX5hPgYwefy6w0H24dcPNgEHcDTQ9_PIz03VL8iNMMgycVQEAIzTHkw!/dl3/d3/L2dJQSEvUUt3QS9ZQnZ3LzZfME80MEkxVkFCOTBFMktTNUJIMjAwMDAwMDA!/?ss=110215&ttype=recarea&recid=41295&actid=50&navtype=BROWSEBYSUBJECT&position=BROWSEBYSUBJECT&navid=110160000000000&pnavid=110000000000000&cid=FSE_003714&pname=White+River+National+Forest+-+Ptarmigan+Peak+Trail+%2335

Rita Mosquita said...

Giardia is one of the big bugs to get in Colorado. I have a friend who got it from drinking water in the mountains. I think it is larger distributed from beaver scat, but there could be more sources. I hear it is not fun to have giardia. We are probably one the states that is notorious for using bottled water. I tend to save juice bottles and jars. Glass is heavier and more likely to break, but then you don't have the challenge of the effects of plastic (cancer, hormones, etc.).